March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

  • In our clinical and research practice here at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), we have found that a number of children have visual issues after a concussion, but they're not typically visual acuity issues. This is something we'd like to get the message out about. The kids we see in our offices who have had a concussion often also have oculomotor issues, whether they are related to problems with smooth pursuits, saccadic function, or the vestibulo-ocular reflex function.

  • New research findings suggest mild blast trauma suffered by military personnel affects portions of the auditory system that have not been extensively studied after injuries occur, and this impairment might be diagnosed using well-established testing methods. The findings raise the possibility that noninvasive auditory tests could identify undiagnosed mild brain injuries earlier.

  • Traumatic brain injury is a huge “hidden disability” within prison populations in the US and the UK. Despite evidence that TBI can lead sufferers to be more violent and reoffend, there is a worrying lack of information about the extent of the problem and there is no standard screening process. At a time when there is huge concern about escalating prison population rates, is it not time this issue was addressed?

  • Surprisingly few people understand the dark realities behind head injuries. In this article, I’m going to shed light on this issue and go over five reasons why suffering a concussion was the hardest experience of my life. In doing so, I’ll hopefully be able to spread awareness towards this issue.

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